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Interchangeable Parts - VW to Porsche

September 26, 2010 | Troubleshooting & Repair | 0 Comments
In reference to VW from 1954 to 1965   Most of the following information is from an article written by Bruce Hall that was published in the 356 Registry Magazine, Volume 2 - Number 3, February 1976. The article was included in the "356 Porsche Technical and Restoration Guide", published in 1984 by the 356 Registry. Use this information with discretion. In many cases the equivalent Porsche part is no more expensive than the VW part and may be more reliable. Perhaps the best way to use this information is: (a) for cosmetic parts that are not mission critical and that may be more available and/or less expensive than Porsche parts and; (b) for mission critical parts when you break down in the middle of nowhere and don't have access to Porsche parts. Use your own judgement in all cases and be aware that The 356 Registry is making this information available for your use and does not make any specific recommendations on any information contained here. Please read the Ful...

More Secure Headrest Installation Method

September 26, 2010 | Troubleshooting & Repair | 0 Comments
By Barry Brisco Headrests were a 356 factory option. The mounting brackets attached high up on the back of the seat backs and were secured with sheet metal screws: a rather flimsy attachment system which tends to loosen over time, but of course they are "headrests" for comfort on long drives, not modern head restraints that are designed to prevent neck injuries that may occur in an accident. Obviously 356 seats offer absolutely no protection against whiplash (neck hyperextension) injury, which some studies estimate occurs in more than one quarter of automobile accidents. The stock seat backs are simply too low, though typical of 50's and 60's cars. The lack of any head restraint system in my 356 has always been a concern to me: I think it is the most serious safety deficiency now that I have 3-point seat belts installed. But I didn't think the factory headrest installation technique offered any significant safety factor, so I never gave much thought to adding them to...

Seat Recliner Disassembly

September 26, 2010 | Troubleshooting & Repair | 2 Comments
Text and photos by Bruce Tuffli [Download this article as a one-page printable PDF file] These instructions are for 356A recliners, but B and C recliners are basically the same. NOTE: THE AUTHOR ASSUMES NO LIABILITY FOR ANY INJURY OR DAMAGE RESULTING FROM FOLLOWING THESE INSTRUCTIONS Remove small screws (arrows, fig. 1) from cover. If you are disassembling the side containing the seat recliner position lock lever (fig. 2), remove the spring by placing and twisting a screwdriver as shown to relieve some pressure, and pull spring out of its retainer with a vise-grip pliers. Remove the lever by unscrewing its retaining bolt using appropriate sockets or wrenches. Note which way spring is situated. You may want to take digital photos as you go along to facilitate assembly later. Pry up the spring with large screwdriver or pry bar (fig. 3). You may cover this with wadded-up thick cloth while prying if you are concerned about the spring flying, but it should stay pretty m...

Dash Knob Refinishing

September 26, 2010 | Troubleshooting & Repair | 2 Comments
By Phil Carne, Alan Lockyer, and Todd Rudaitis Phil Carney: One of the easy restoration items on a 356 that any one can do is knob restoration. It turns out that the knobs are soluble in lacquer thinner (not paint thinner). Make a little holder using a wooden dowel stuck in the theaded hole. Using the dowel stick, immerse the knob in lacquer thinner for 15 to 45 seconds or so (don't let it touch anything while in the lacquer thinner). Remove knob and use a stiff lint-free cloth to brush the surface so that all crazing disappears. You can even remove small nicks by reimmersing and rebrushing to fill them in. Let the knob dry overnight without touching anything. I drilled a bunch of holes in a piece of wood and put the dowel holding the knob in the hole. The next day I polished each knob on a buffing wheel using blue polishing compound. Since plastic heats pretty easily, I assume a buffer on the end of a drill could also be used. It is almost like magic how th...

Colors for Dash Knobs, Steering Columns & Wheels

September 26, 2010 | Troubleshooting & Repair | 0 Comments
By Tim Herman and Norm Miller Tim Herman: Here are the color formulations for the Grey and Beige knobs, steering wheels, etc. This is for Akzo Nobel/Sikkens acrylic enamel. Used with the catalyst the applied product is very durable and to my eyes dead-on with nice original (albeit old) parts. Your results may differ! BEIGE Quantity 0.30 Liter Product: ABP P1 ColorCode: 426B3 Akzo Code: 426B3 Color Map: 426B3 Q120 276.8 g Q326 0.1 g Q160 1.0 g Q437 10.3 g Q065 86.4 g GREY Quantity 0.30 Liter Product: ABP P1 ColorCode: 419G4 Akzo Code: 419G4 Color Map: 419G4 Q110 204.8 g Q652 1.2 g Q348 1.6 g Q160 14.0 g Q328 25.7 g Q065 76.0 g Norm Miller: I found the closest match in rattle cans to be Do it Best Rust Coat Enamel, sku 790095 Gloss Sand 1018 (1-6) , manufactured by Do it Best Corp, Ft Wayne, Indiana. [Editor] With the change in Sep. 1959 to the 356B model, those par...

Colors for Dash Knobs, Steering Columns & Wheels

September 26, 2010 | Research & Identification | 0 Comments
By Tim Herman and Norm Miller Tim Herman: Here are the color formulations for the Grey and Beige knobs, steering wheels, etc. This is for Akzo Nobel/Sikkens acrylic enamel. Used with the catalyst the applied product is very durable and to my eyes dead-on with nice original (albeit old) parts. Your results may differ! BEIGE Quantity 0.30 Liter Product: ABP P1 ColorCode: 426B3 Akzo Code: 426B3 Color Map: 426B3 Q120 276.8 g Q326 0.1 g Q160 1.0 g Q437 10.3 g Q065 86.4 g GREY Quantity 0.30 Liter Product: ABP P1 ColorCode: 419G4 Akzo Code: 419G4 Color Map: 419G4 Q110 204.8 g Q652 1.2 g Q348 1.6 g Q160 14.0 g Q328 25.7 g Q065 76.0 g Norm Miller: I found the closest match in rattle cans to be Do it Best Rust Coat Enamel, sku 790095 Gloss Sand 1018 (1-6) , manufactured by Do it Best Corp, Ft Wayne, Indiana. [Editor] With the change in Sep. 1959 to the 356B model, those par...

Electric Clock Adjusting Screw

September 26, 2010 | Troubleshooting & Repair | 0 Comments
By Don Ahearn [Editor: This article is reprinted from the 356 Registry magazine, Brett Johnson's Restoration column, Vol. 21 No. 4 Nov / Dec 1997] Every electric clock I've ever seen for a late 356 has an adjusting screw on it, and you don't have to open the clock to get to it. It's on the back. When looking at the back cover, it's at the lower right corner, directly below and in line with the positive connection. If the positive wire is connected you may not see it right away, but it's there. The adjusting screw is an ordinary slotted screw, and it lives behind a tiny hole, maybe 1/16" diameter. It is marked "+" and "-" for fast and slow. You'll need a tiny jeweler's screwdriver; a set of 6 is available at any hobby shop for cheap. You don't even need to remove the radio to get to this stuff. Remove the glovebox liner instead. Just undo the two chrome Phillips screws that hold the metal strap behind the glovebox liner, and work thro...

Factory Fresh Air Blower

September 26, 2010 | Research & Identification | 3 Comments
By Barry Lee Brisco, with contributions from Jim Beam, Ken Daugherty, Steve Fox, Linus Pauling Jr., and Charlie White 356 coupes had little provision for providing adequate supplies of unheated outside air into the cabin if the windows were closed and the heater was turned off. 356A/B models had fresh air vents in the footwells, but they worked poorly, as they were covered with carpet and relied on the speed of the car to force air through them. With the introduction of the T6 body style in September, 1962, a lever on the dash opened vents located in the trunk that forced air into the cabin, but still no power assist was used so the system only had an effect at speed, and even then the results were marginal. On a rainy day where the ambient air temperature was not down in the chilly ranges, if the driver wished to keep the rain out by closing the windows, but wanted the heat off so he didn't boil, the result was usually a stuffy cabin with foggy windows. Of course, ma...

Speaker Sources for T6 Cars

September 26, 2010 | Troubleshooting & Repair | 0 Comments
By Bob Cannon The original round speaker size for the T6 cars was about 5 inches in diameter; current speakers come in 5 1/4 inch diameters, which fit well, but may require that the mounting tabs be trimmed to fit within the speaker grills. The major problem you will face is the overwhelming number of choices available and picking the "best" set for our 1960 versions of a radio. If you are using your original radio, you should choose replacement speakers with high efficiency ratings since the output of these radios is much less than modern units. Efficiency is generally measured in decibels per watt at one meter, or dB/Wm. With an input of a single watt, a speaker with a sensitivity of 90 dB/Wm will produce 90 decibels (dB) of sound at a one-meter distance. Most ìhighly efficient speakers have dB ratings of 91 or above and a speaker rated 3 dB higher than another will require half as much power to produce the same output. Minimum power ratings on speakers provide...

Switching Seats Between Models

September 26, 2010 | Troubleshooting & Repair | 0 Comments
By Jim Breazeale, Al Zim, and Ron Anthony An oft asked question is, "Will the seats from a (Porsche model name) fit into a (different Porsche model name)?" Below are the answers! (Jim Breazeale:) Speedster, GT and even bench seats will interchange with coupe seats. Any T5, T2, T1, or 356 (There is no such thing as a "Pre A") seat will fit on the tracks. T6 seats all use the same mounts and are not compatible with T5 and earlier seat mounts. 911/912 early seats will not fit in a 356. They are similar but are far too wide to fit on the tracks. Also the seat stops are on the oposite side. Some of the parts in the recliner mechanisms are interchangable, though. (Al Zim:) For seats from 1954 though 1957 model year (fat rear seat back). and 1958 through 1961 (thin seat back), including Speedster seats and non-reclining Roadster seats, all will interchange 1954 through 1961. At the start of the T-6 cars 1962 model year through the end of 356 production ...